Selected Essays of T. S. Eliot, 1917-1932 Characters

This Study Guide consists of approximately 49 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Selected Essays of T. S. Eliot, 1917-1932.
This section contains 1,788 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Selected Essays of T. S. Eliot, 1917-1932 Study Guide

Dante Alighieri

Alighieri (1265-1321) is one of the most revered poets of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, written in the common language of Florence, Italy, is a masterpiece of Catholic philosophy and poetry. His earlier work, Vita Nuova, describes Dante's idealized youthful love for a Florentine woman named Beatrice. Eliot calls Dante the most "universal" of poets because his poetry has "peculiar lucidity" (a clear and transparent beauty) and his philosophy has the benefit of a united cultural belief (influenced by St. Thomas Aquinas). Born in 1265 and raised in Florence, Dante was exiled in 1301 because of fighting between political factions in the Guelph family.

St. Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274) was the most important religious philosopher of medieval Europe. By reconciling Aristotelian philosophy and Christian theology in Summa theological, he created the extremely influential system of thought apparent in the work of Dante Alighieri.

Matthew Arnold

(read more from the Key Figures section)

This section contains 1,788 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Selected Essays of T. S. Eliot, 1917-1932 Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
Selected Essays of T. S. Eliot, 1917-1932 from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook