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John Milton Writing Styles in Samson Agonistes, and Shorter Poems

This Study Guide consists of approximately 41 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Samson Agonistes, and Shorter Poems.
This section contains 1,054 words
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Style

Point of View

Most of this volume is written in the third person, through which the poet assumes the role of an omniscient storyteller. Even when he writes about personal matters, such as his attraction to joyfulness in "L'Allegro" and to melancholy in "Il Pensoroso," he addresses these moods directly for the most part, rather than using first person to discuss their impact on him. In both those poems, he finally breaks from this declamatory tone into first person at the very end, achieving the dramatic impact of turning what seemed to be a philosophical rumination into a personal conviction. The most consistent use of first person in the book is in "Lycidas," when Milton writes about the death of a close friend. In this case, it seems he cannot avoid bringing himself into the poem, because the impact of the death of Lycidas was too personal to address...

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This section contains 1,054 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Samson Agonistes, and Shorter Poems Study Guide
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Samson Agonistes, and Shorter Poems from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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