Sam Houston and the American Southwest - Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis

Randolph B. Campbell
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The Compromise of 1850 created a fragile sense of goodwill for a few years. Houston continued to preach for peace and the importance of the Union versus Southern secession. There was some talk of Houston becoming a presidential candidate, but Houston seemed content to remain in domestic bliss with his wife Margaret and several children. In 1852, Franklin Pierce, a relative unknown was elected and the author wonders whether Houston "missed his shot" by not running in 1852.

At the beginning of 1853, Houston was elected to another term in the Senate. In December 1853, the relative national peace was shattered when the controversial Kansas Nebraska Act was crafted, which would provide 'popular sovereignty' to newly created states, such that they could choose, by vote, whether to have slavery or not. The Act would also repeal the Missouri Compromise of 1821, which established a northern geographical limit to slavery. There was...

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This section contains 427 words
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Buy the Sam Houston and the American Southwest Study Guide
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