Daniel Defoe Writing Styles in Robinson Crusoe

This Study Guide consists of approximately 39 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Robinson Crusoe.
This section contains 687 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Robinson Crusoe Study Guide

Narrative

Robinson Crusoe is a fictional autobiography written from a first-person point of view, apparently written by an old man looking back on his life. The story also includes material from an incomplete diary, which is integrated into the novel.

Verisimilitude

Although heavily influenced by religious concerns and technique, Defoe's use of realism, or verisimilitude, is perhaps the most singular aspect of the work What Defoe did was apply and thereby popularize modern realism.

Modern realism—as formulated by Descartes and Locke but not fully outlined until Thomas Reid—holds that truth should be discovered at the individual level by verification of the senses. The realistic elements of Robinson Crusoe include the lists, time scale, repetition, diary, and Crusoe's ordinary nature. The reader could almost use Robinson Crusoe as a handbook if ever stuck on a deserted island.

Allegory

Many critics view Robinson Crusoe as an allegory for Defoe's...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 687 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Robinson Crusoe Study Guide
Copyrights
Novels for Students
Robinson Crusoe from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.