Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected Characters

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Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected Summary & Study Guide Description

Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion on Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected by Roald Dahl.

Mikeappears in Taste

Mike is the host of the party in "Taste"; he is convinced that his guest will never be able to identify the wine he has chosen - to his detriment.

Richard Prattappears in Taste

Mike's guest in "Taste" who cheats at identifying the wine in order to win Mike's daughter's hand in marriage.

Narratorappears in Taste

A guest at the dinner party; an innocent bystander.

Maidappears in Taste

The character who gives away Richard Pratt's game in "Taste."

Mary Maloneyappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

The wife of Patrick Maloney, who ends up killing him with a leg of lamb and then serving the lamb to the investigating officers.

Patrick Maloneyappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

A police officer who has decided to leave his wife - but who gets murdered in the process.

Noonanappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

One of the investigating police officers who eats the lamb - the murder weapon.

O'Malleyappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

One of the investigating police officers who eats the lamb - the murder weapon.

Narratorappears in Man from the South

The narrator is a witness in this story, whereby a cadet and man enter into a bet.

Manappears in Man from the South

The nameless man who is fascinated by betting people's fingers against cars in otherwise meaningless bets.

Cadetappears in Man from the South

The young American man who takes the Man's bet about the lighter. Initially hesitant, the Cadet becomes enamored of the idea of the car and agrees to the Man's conditions.

Wifeappears in Man from the South

One of the Man's victims, who eventually won a car from him.

Arthurappears in My Lady Love, My Dove

The slightly hapless husband in the story, who has some sense of morality yet follows his wife's bidding.

Pamelaappears in My Lady Love, My Dove

Arthur's conniving wife, who both insists on bugging their guests' room and later, on learning how to count cards to cheat at bridge. A stubborn, unpleasant woman.

The Snapesappears in My Lady Love, My Dove

The bridge partners of Arthur and Pamela, the Snapes seem like a wealthy, pleasant young couple but actually make their living cheating at bridge.

Mr. Botibolappears in Dip in the Pool

The protagonist of the story, who decides that he will win the betting pool. He is overwhelmed by his desire for money, and goes to extremes to attain it in this case.

Purserappears in Dip in the Pool

An important member of the ship's crew, who wrongly tips off Mr. Botibol about the following day's progress.

Womanappears in Dip in the Pool

The only witness to Mr. Botibol's fall; she is somehow mentally incapacitated, or believed to be so, and nobody believes her story about the man falling.

Perkinsappears in Galloping Foxley

A straight-laced businessman and commuter, overwhelmed by injustices from the past brought up by the memory of Foxley.

Bruce Foxleyappears in Galloping Foxley

The bully who tormented Perkins back at school.

Fatherappears in Galloping Foxley

A proper man, Perkins' father became the initial reason for Foxley's torment.

Jocelyn Fortescueappears in Galloping Foxley

The actual man who sits opposite Perkins on the train; pleasant, he bears a slight resemblance to Foxley.

Drioliappears in Skin

A tattoo artist, who later becomes destitute and despondent, and then decides to sell the "art" on his back.

Kalmuchappears in Skin

Drioli's friend; a painter who was in love with Josie and who later became famous. The artist who tattooed Drioli's back.

Josieappears in Skin

Drioli's wife; a charming woman, whose portrait is now on his back, and who died in the war.

Sir Basil Turtonappears in Neck

A weak man; an art collector who was a popular bachelor until Natalia "captured" him in marriage.

Narratorappears in Neck

A journalist who desires entry into the Turton home and who gets it by talking to Natalia at a party.

Nataliaappears in Neck

The foreign wife of Sir Basil Turton; a controlling, unpleasant, probably cheating woman.

Lionelappears in Nunc Dimiltis

The pompous narrator of the story, who decides to take revenge for a reported slight by showing a picture of the gossiper nearly nude.

Janetappears in Nunc Dimiltis

The gossiper and lady friend of Lionel, who perhaps poisons him with caviar.

Gladys Ponsbyappears in Nunc Dimiltis

The "friend" of Lionel's who reports Janet's gossip back to him.

John Roydonappears in Nunc Dimiltis

The portrait painter celebrated about town for his accurate and flattering paintings of women.

The Landladyappears in The Landlady

The owner of the bed and breakfast where Bill Weaver stops by; apparently a little looney, the landlady taxidermies her pets as well as her visitors.

Bill Weaverappears in The Landlady

A young businessman traveling for work.

Williamappears in William and Mary

The controlling, pompous, and unpleasant professor who is married to Mary and decides to have his brain preserved after his death.

Maryappears in William and Mary

The put-upon wife of William, who was initially set against his plan to have his brain kept alive in perpetuity.

Landyappears in William and Mary

The scientist who proposes to William that he preserve his brain after his death.

Mrs. Fosterappears in The Way up to Heaven

The nervous and ever-punctual protagonist of the story, Mrs. Foster is driven mad by her husband's lateness and stalling.

Mr. Fosterappears in The Way up to Heaven

The stalling husband of Mrs. Foster.

Mr. Boggisappears in Parson's Pleasure

The cheating antique dealer who pretends to be a parson to lure valuable furniture out of unsuspecting victims' hands.

Rummis, Bert, and Claudappears in Parson's Pleasure

The farmers from whom Mr. Boggis buys the commode. They are a dull bunch, but attempt to be helpful; they think that they are, in fact, duping Mr. Boggis.

Mrs. Bixbyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

The clever but fading wife of Mr. Bixby, Mrs. Bixby had a long-standing affair outside of the city.

Mr. Bixbyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

A dentist who appears to be a dupe but is actually having an affair of his own.

Miss Pulteneyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

The object of Mr. Bixby's affection; his receptionist.

Maud Taylorappears in Royal Jelly

The mother of a new baby, Maud is Albert's wife and horrified by the measures he has taken to feed their baby.

Albert Taylorappears in Royal Jelly

A bee-keeper, Albert has been entranced by the possibilities of using royal jelly for various purposes; he is stubborn and secretive, and has been deceiving his wife for some time.

Edwardappears in Edward the Conqueror

Louisa's husband; a no-nonsense man who does not want to put up with a composer reincarnated as a cat.

Louisaappears in Edward the Conqueror

Edward's musical wife, who discovers that their cat is the reincarnated composer Franz Liszt. A superstitious woman.

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