Related Topics

Maureen Duffy Writing Styles in Rites

This Study Guide consists of approximately 29 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Rites.
This section contains 432 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Rites Study Guide

Language

The language of the play reveals the characters to be working class women from London or the London suburbs. This is apparent from a number of ungrammatical expressions. The clearest example is Ada, who says, "I've stuck me pencil in me eye"; the "me" is a nonstandard version of "my." The characters use many slang expressions, some of which may be unfamiliar to American ears. "Copped," as in "copped the whole roll" means seized or stolen. "French letter" is British slang for a condom; a "conker," as in Nellie's comment that her husband's shoes "shone like conkers" is the fruit of the horse chestnut tree. In the fall, British schoolchildren play a game called conkers with these fruits. "Bloke" is working class slang for man, the equivalent of the American use of "guy." It is more common in southern than northern England.

Realism and Fantasy

Duffy commented in...

(read more)

This section contains 432 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Rites Study Guide
Copyrights
Drama for Students
Rites from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook