Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America - Chapter 33 Summary & Analysis

John M. Barry
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Chapter 33 Summary

After the flooding comes a drought, then infestations of insects and worms, followed by an early freeze. Less than one quarter of the meager available crops are harvested. Tens of thousands of people develop pellagra, a disease of malnutrition. Subsequent rebuilding leads to extensive and systematic racial discrimination and political corruption. Although Hoover has fostered the Colored Advisory Committee, their plans and vision are extremely different. Hoover uses the committee as long as it is politically expedient, but he does not come through on his many promises. Meanwhile, Moton continues to support Hoover, apparently unaware that Hoover has no real intentions of making good. Hoover wins the presidential nomination.

Chapter 33 Analysis

Chapter 33 concludes Part Eight - The Great Humanitarian, the eighth of nine named sections of the text. This chapter provides more information on the long-term after-effects of the flood. The author considers...

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This section contains 327 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America Study Guide
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