Rigoberta Menchú Writing Styles in I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala

This Study Guide consists of approximately 50 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of I, Rigoberta Menchu.
This section contains 294 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala Study Guide

Setting

Menchú's story begins with the story of her parents, her orphaned father and her abandoned mother, who both matured under the same impoverished conditions as Menchú herself. In her narration, Menchú takes the reader from the dreadful conditions of the finca to the difficult but fulfilling communal life.

Symbolism

There are two salient symbols which Menchú weaves through her narrative: maize and talk. Maize (corn) is the center of the Indian economy; they eat, sell, and feed their animals with maize. They hold elaborate ceremonies before the first yearly harvest of maize. Childbirth ceremonies reaffirm that humans are made of maize, and how the essence of humans can be found in maize. Maize is the lifeblood of the Quiché Indian culture.

Talk is another important representation of Quiché culture; it is through talk, spoken language, that those near death pass on...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 294 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala Study Guide
Copyrights
Literature of Developing Nations for Students
I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala from Literature of Developing Nations for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook