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King Richard III Essay | Critical Essay #12

This Study Guide consists of approximately 255 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of King Richard III.
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Critical Essay #12

Critics have studied the women in Richard III for their significance both as individuals and as a group. Madonne M. Miner, for example, focuses on the play's misogyny (the hatred of women), stating that Richard continually blames women instead of accepting the guilt which is really his own. Miner and Irene G. Dash also discuss the women's role as "ciphers" or "non-persons," especially after they become widows and their sole source of power and of social identity-their husbands-is gone. Both critics note a positive element of women's fate in the play: Through their adversity, the women eventually identify with each other and unite against Richard.

Taken individually, the four women each pose certain problems for critics. E. M. W. Tillyard regrets that Shakespeare included the scene (Act IV, scene iv) in which Richard asks for Queen Elizabeth's blessing to marry her daughter. Tillyard states that Elizabeth's weak submission...

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This section contains 6,620 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our King Richard III Study Guide
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King Richard III from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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