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Kazuo Ishiguro Writing Styles in The Remains of the Day

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Style

First-Person Narration

For the most part, the style of The Remains of the Day flows from the voice of Stevens, whose memories provide the novel's text. The entire book is his account of the past and present, which gives the reader a distinct impression of his character. Stevens's style is formal, courteous, and longwinded. He has a tendency to be very precise in his communication, to overthink matters, and to share his every thought. For example, rather than simply explaining that Mr. Farraday's banter makes him uncomfortable, Stevens rambles on with reasons why he is unable to engage with his employer in this way, with what he imagines Mr. Farraday thinks of him, and with his judgment that his inability to banter is a failing of his duties. He returns to this concern repeatedly.

As Stevens relates events of the past, all the while emphasizing the admiration he felt...

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This section contains 684 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Remains of the Day Study Guide
Copyrights
The Remains of the Day from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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