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Reading Lolita in Tehran, A Memoir in Books - Study Guide Part 1: Chapter 13 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 58 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Reading Lolita in Tehran, A Memoir in Books.
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The study group notes that Lolita is a victim of two crimes. Not only is her life confiscated by Humbert, but her life story is taken as well. Lolita is, in effect, unable to speak. Nafisi's study class existed to prevent such a loss of voice at least for these few students.

In Lolita, Humbert attempts to draw the reader's sympathy to himself by presenting the victim as a despicable, shallow creature. He refers to Lolita as "disgustingly conventional." Humbert tries to exonerate himself by blaming the victim:"it was she who seduced me."

Nafisi sees a direct parallel in Iranian society. For example, movie theaters were burned down not because the ayatollahs opposed cinema, but because they "opposed prostitution." Similarly, Humbert explains that Lolita is depraved and of loose morals because of such innovations as co-education.

Humbert never succeeds in owning Lolita willingly. Each...

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This section contains 234 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Reading Lolita in Tehran, A Memoir in Books Study Guide
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