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D. H. Lawrence Writing Styles in The Rainbow

This Study Guide consists of approximately 63 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Rainbow.
This section contains 930 words
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Style

Points of View

The novel is told in the third person omniscient. The narrator records the thoughts and feelings of three generations of characters, including many lengthy monologues, as they consider their religious faith. The narrator is generally neutral about many of the characters, although there are some moments in which the narrator discusses homosexual characters, and the reader feels that a negative judgment is being emphasized. For the most part, the emphasis is not on plot development. Instead, the narrator focuses on the relationships between characters and the conflicts that develop. Often the narrator offers conflicting perspectives on the same relationship. The most developed examples of conflicting perspectives include the relationship between Anna and Will, and the relationship between Will and his daughter Ursula.

The story is a family chronicle, recording the same patterns as they continue through three generations. Though the story begins with Tom Brangwen's own...

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This section contains 930 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Rainbow Study Guide
Copyrights
The Rainbow from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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