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The Radicalism of the American Revolution Chapter Summary & Analysis - Part 3, Chapter 16 Summary

Gordon S. Wood
This Study Guide consists of approximately 83 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Radicalism of the American Revolution.
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Part 3, Chapter 16 Summary and Analysis

The American gentry are not strong enough at the outset of the Revolution to bear the burden of disinterested service in the army or Congress. Periodic retirement to recoup one's fortune is commonplace. From 1776 onwards, legislators urge republican governments to pay salaries - and to increase them regularly. The radical Pennsylvania constitution of 1776 abolishes all potentially corrupting "offices of profit" in favor of "reasonable compensation" for all public servants. Washington refuses a salary as commander-in-chief, and Jefferson holds fast to Roman principle. Others, principally Federalists, lacking Jefferson's wealth and Washington's scruples, must press for adequate pay. Govenor Morris, in 1778, questions whether even the wealthy should be required to sacrifice their family's subsistence for the public good. John Adams calls for all public officials to be paid and criticizes Pennsylvania's decision, saying patronage and abuse rather than profit are evil. The alternative is a...

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This section contains 1,446 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Radicalism of the American Revolution Study Guide
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The Radicalism of the American Revolution from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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