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The Radicalism of the American Revolution - Part 2, Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis

Gordon S. Wood
This Study Guide consists of approximately 83 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Radicalism of the American Revolution.
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Part 2, Chapter 9 Summary and Analysis

By the early 1770s, society seems less ordained by God and more man-made and increasingly arbitrary. By adopting new enlightened standards of paternalism, rulers of all sorts are collaborating in the weakening of their authority. Unlike rulers elsewhere, English rulers cannot use compulsion, but must be liberal and enlightened to gain the natural affection and respect of dependents. In the colonies, these efforts are met with fear and resentment, and the refusal to meet traditional obligations.

In hindsight, John Adams identifies the source of revolution in the systematic dissolution of family authority. By 1750, few fathers dare deal with their households as arbitrarily as a century earlier. Married American women have more legal rights than their British counterparts, particularly in the initiation of divorce. Sons and daughters are leaving home more readily and demanding choice in potential spouses. Premarital pregnancy is used to force...

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This section contains 1,340 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Radicalism of the American Revolution Study Guide
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The Radicalism of the American Revolution from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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