Related Topics

Rabelais and His World - Study Guide Chapter 4, Chapter 2 - The Language of the Marketplace Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Rabelais and His World.
This section contains 489 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Rabelais and His World Study Guide

Shortly after the author informs readers about billingsgate, he begins to write about the boy. In this case, he means both the image of the boy and the reality of it. There is the boy as a universal as well as a sample character. The author writes briefly of the village boy and his exuberance while playing; here, innocence is attached to hurling excrement and to mudslinging. In this case, the village boy is playfully self-indulgent rather than malicious or cruel. A certain presence or lack of cruelty seems to be innate but people can be trained in either direction—away from it, or to nurture it. Mikhail then writes that Rabelais' image of the village boy is inadequate: he justifies this claim by citing that he is actually working...

(read more from the Chapter 4, Chapter 2 - The Language of the Marketplace Summary)

This section contains 489 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Rabelais and His World Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Rabelais and His World from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.