Ernst Gombrich Writing Styles in Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation

Ernst Gombrich
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Narration is the telling of a series of events, often in chronological order, and generally in a way that creates a story. Certainly, in his Story of Art, Gombrich creates a narrative that gives a sense of unity to the history of art. Likewise, in Art and Illusion, Gombrich's stated purpose is to "explain why art has a history." Although he begins with the nineteenth-century painter John Constable, Gombrich soon jumps back to early Greek art to begin his story of "making and matching." Gombrich's narration is one that traces the way artists attempting to represent reality employ tradition and experimentation in their art. Furthermore, Gombrich includes in his narration both the changes artists make and the changes viewers must make as they are confronted with new ways in which art represents reality. Because Gombrich chooses to use a narrative style, the book itself, while long and at...

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This section contains 280 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation Study Guide
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