Plato Writing Styles in Protagoras and Meno

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Perspective

The point of view of the dialogue is first person, from Socrates' point of view. Socrates begins having a conversation with Hippocrates, who has come to his house to summon him to go to see Protagoras. In the Protagoras dialogue, the point of view shifts rapidly from Socrates to Protagoras and back. It keeps in a dialogue form, with the lines of the two main characters and other characters given as if they were actors in a play. The fundamental viewpoint, when other characters are referred to, or the general atmosphere of the room where the dialogue takes placed, is discussed, remains that of Socrates. That is that Socrates functions as the narrator, when no one is speaking. What keeps the dialogue going is that the spectators want it to continue. Socrates is forced to negotiate with Protagoras to continue with the dialogue on agreeable terms, instead of...

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This section contains 743 words
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Buy the Protagoras and Meno Study Guide
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