Plutarch's Lives, Volume 2 Quotes

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"For as it is the opinion of philosophers, that could you take away strife and opposition out of the universe, all the heavenly bodies would stand still, generation and motion would cease in the mutual concord and agreement of all things, so the Spartan legislator seems to have admitted ambition and emulation, among the ingredients of his Commonwealth, as the incentives of virtue, distinctly wishing that there should be some dispute and competition among his men of worth, and pronouncing the mere idle, uncontested, mutual compliance to unproved deserts to be but a false sort of concord...Yet this maxim is not simply to be granted, without restriction, for if animosities go too far, they are very dangerous to cities, and of most pernicious consequence"  (Agesilaus. pg. 42.)

"Pompey now desired the honor of a triumph, which Sylla opposed, alleging that the law allowed that honor to none but consuls...

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This section contains 1,101 words
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Buy the Plutarch's Lives, Volume 2 Study Guide
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