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The Piano Lesson Essay | Critical Essay #4

This Study Guide consists of approximately 71 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Piano Lesson.
This section contains 626 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay #4

Henry reviews a 1989 Chicago performance of the The Piano Lesson, finding much to recommend in the play's content and the production.

The piano in Doaker Charles' living room is a family heirloom, and like most heirlooms it is prized more than used, its value measured less in money than in memories. For this piano, the Charles family was torn asunder in slavery times: to acquire it, the white man who owned them traded away Doaker's grandmother and father, then a nine-year-old. On this piano, Doaker's grieving grandfather, the plantation carpenter, carved portrait sculptures in African style of the wife and son he had lost. To Doaker's hothead older brother, born under the second slavery of Jim Crow, the carvings on the piano made it the rightful property of his kin, and he lost his life in a successful conspiracy to steal it.

Now, in 1936, it sits admired but...

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This section contains 626 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Piano Lesson Study Guide
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The Piano Lesson from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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