Peer Gynt Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 59 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Peer Gynt.
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Absurdity

Because Peer Gynt was conceived of as poetical fantasy, Ibsen had little concern with creating reality. Many of the things that Peer does are unrealistic and absurd, beginning with Act I when the play opens to Peer's inventive and clearly exaggerated story of hunting, a story his mother believes. Another example occurs within a few lines when Peer picks up his mother and sets her atop the roof of her house. Still another sequence that is absurd is Peer's meeting with the trolls in the forest. Peer is willing to become one of the trolls, even wearing a tail and consuming the troll's natural food. Ibsen uses these absurd situations and characters to poke fun at society. The playwright makes clear that the situations Peer is placed in are as absurd as some of the elements within the society where Ibsen lives.

Love

Although Peer kidnaps Ingrid on...

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This section contains 850 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Peer Gynt Study Guide
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Drama for Students
Peer Gynt from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.