Out of Our Past: The Forces That Shaped Modern America - Chapter XI: Alabaster Cities and Amber Waves of Grain Summary & Analysis

Carl Neumann Degler
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Chapter XI: Alabaster Cities and Amber Waves of Grain Summary and Analysis

In modern times, the majority of the civilized world has become urbanized. The United States became part of the urban revolution during the latter half of the 19th century. Prior to that time most people were farmers and depended on good-sized towns in the region to serve their needs. By 1920, the census reflected that over half of Americans lived in cities.

1. The Lure of the City

Man was only able to urbanize because there was enough farmland for willing farmers to provide sufficient food for them and their families. The growth of city populations can also be tied directly to the growth of industry. Generally speaking, there was a move from the farm to the city because it was felt that there were more opportunities...

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This section contains 953 words
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