Oscar Wilde - Chapter 17, 'I Am the Prosecutor in This Case' Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 17, 'I Am the Prosecutor in This Case' Summary

The first of Wilde's trials is ironic in that Wilde brings it on himself. He sues Lord Queensbury, Douglas' father, for libel. Unfortunately for Wilde, Queensbury's position allows him to turn the tables, where the trial becomes an examination of Oscar's homosexuality and his behavior in this mode. Even if Queensbury loses, he wins the point that Oscar Wilde is homosexual and probably the victory over his son and Wilde that he truly wants, which is to kill their relationship.

Shortly before the trial, Wilde considers fleeing to Paris because he realizes that nothing good can come of this for him. Douglas performs a manipulation stunt in which he sheds tears, and this has a dramatic affect on Oscar. He decides not to take the Paris route.

Wilde handles...

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This section contains 413 words
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Buy the Oscar Wilde Study Guide
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