Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution - Chapter 7, Federalism Summary & Analysis

Jack N. Rakove
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Chapter 7, Federalism Summary

The role of Federalism versus states rights continues to be the focal point of debate. What exactly is the relationship of the states to each other and to the federal government?

The major flaw in the Articles of Confederation is that it didn’t give the Congress any power over the states. Without a national government strong enough to control them, territorial disputes and splintering factions had led to the formation of new states from existing states. The power vested in a strong national authority would bring this practice to a halt. The formation of a National Domain means that newly formed states entering the Union would be on an equal footing with the existing states.

The role of the framers of the Constitution was to define limits on the powers of the states and the powers of the national government...

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This section contains 1,080 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution Study Guide
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