Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution - Chapter 3, The Madisonian Moment Summary & Analysis

Jack N. Rakove
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Chapter 3, The Madisonian Moment Summary

“In framing a system which we wish to last for ages, we shd. not lose sight of the changes which ages will produce…. [I]t was more than probable we were now digesting a plan which in its operation will decide forever the fate of Republican Govt.” (pg. 33-34). These are the words of James Madison as he addresses the convention in Philadelphia on June 26, 1787. Madison, like few other attendees, appreciates the grandeur of the moment. Experienced in service at both the state and national levels, Madison sees the shortcomings in the Articles of Confederation and the form of government it resulted in: a weak Congress with no authority to force the states to comply with national policy and no way to raise the revenues necessary for running a national government.

Madison prepares himself for the Annapolis...

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This section contains 787 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution Study Guide
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