No Ordinary Time - Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 53 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of No Ordinary Time.
This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the No Ordinary Time Study Guide

Chapter 7 Summary

Eleanor Roosevelt put herself in the middle of racial controversy in September of 1940, by speaking at the Convention of Sleeping Car Porters, a mostly Negro group. Eleanor had championed the economic needs of black Americans during the 1930s. She was instrumental in getting her husband to sign an Anti-Discrimination provision on WPA projects. She spoke up publicly for racial equality and invited black Americans by the hundreds to the White House.

The President gained by her efforts among black voters, who were migrating into large cities like New York and Chicago. By keeping a lower profile on the issues himself, he maintained viability in a Southern-dominated Congress.

A new and bigger issue arose in the form of eliminating racial segregation and discrimination in the Armed Forces. Negro leaders were particularly angry that well- qualified blacks were denied promotions and well-paying jobs in the...

(read more from the Chapter 7 Summary)

This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the No Ordinary Time Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
No Ordinary Time from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook