A Narrow Fellow in the Grass Summary & Study Guide

This Study Guide consists of approximately 31 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Narrow Fellow in the Grass.
This section contains 664 words
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Lines 1-4:

In the opening quatrain, Dickinson cleverly disguises the subject of the poem, a snake. This creature sounds harmless enough as it is introduced in line one. The term "narrow Fellow" is a nice use of colloquial language, "narrow," meaning small in width as compared to length, and "fellow" being a familiar term for a man or a boy, with an undertone that suggests commonness. The choice of the word "rides" is also interesting because it sounds like "glides" and "writhes" but gives the impression that the snake is being carried, or that it is floating along. In addition, the word can also mean torment, harass, or tease, and this definition fits the snake's reputation as a sly tempter. The speaker goes on to ask readers if they, too, have ever encountered snakes, noting that these "narrow fellows" always seem to take people by surprise.

Lines 5-8:

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This section contains 664 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Narrow Fellow in the Grass Study Guide
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Gale
A Narrow Fellow in the Grass from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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