Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others - Adapa and Etana Summary & Analysis

Stephanie Dalley
This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Myths from Mesopotamia.
This section contains 808 words
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Adapa and Etana Summary and Analysis

The author begins by explaining that Adapa was a sage sent by Ea, god of the first city, that of Eridu, to show mankind how to build a civilization. Adapa was responsible for showing man religious rites, but angered Ea, and thus lost his right to immortality. The author also notes this story is severely fragmented. The myth begins, after a few missing lines, by explaining that Ea gave Adapa wisdom, but not eternal life. Adapa is described as higher than man, much like Atrahasis in the Flood story, and as a holy and pure man, responsible for tending the rites, baking with bakers of the town, and fishing for Eridu. On one journey, however, he sets sail without a rudder, with a strong South Wind, and is blown over. Angered, he curses the South Wind, and...

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This section contains 808 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others Study Guide
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