Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others - Preface 1, Preface 2, List of Figures, Sigla and Abbreviations, Introduction, Chronological Chart, and Map of the Near East Summary & Analysis

Stephanie Dalley
This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Myths from Mesopotamia.
This section contains 374 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)

Preface 1, Preface 2, List of Figures, Sigla and Abbreviations, Introduction, Chronological Chart, and Map of the Near East Summary and Analysis

This book tells ten different myths from ancient Mesopotamia and introduces readers to early beliefs about the origin of the world, the creation of mankind, and the reasons for seasons and weather patterns. Simultaneously, the book introduces readers to variations of stories they may already know from texts such as the Old Testament and Arabian Nights. With introductions to explain where each version of each myth was discovered, through these written works these tales of the rise and fall of gods show clearly that what began as oral tradition spans both time and distance.

The Prefaces explain briefly how the myths have come into existence. The List of Figures section is simply a table of contents for the figures in the book, of which there are two. The Sigla and Abbreviations section describes certain aspects of the text and what those mean. The Introduction explains the origin of the myths, which are about the gods of Mesopotamia, an area that lies between the Tigris and Euphrates in what is now Iraq. There are often different versions of the same story, some of which vary drastically from tablet to tablet. Further, many tablets are partially destroyed, so that only fragments of the myth exist. Also, since the people of Mesopotamia traveled throughout the world, their myths and legends often make up the basis for tales in other languages and in other areas, such as tales in the Old Testament, the Iliad, Arabian Nights, and hundreds of others. An understanding of the origins of these tales is vital to understanding the stories behind the legends. Thus, this Introduction is necessary, both to place the text in a proper setting and to explain the reasoning for the multiple versions of stories given within the book. Finally, the author's notes of similarities between other stories helps relate the Mesopotamian tales to better known stories. The Chronological Chart shows a simplified time line of events to help the reader understand time lines given within the introductions to each myth.

This section contains 374 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
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