Mystery and Manners; Occasional Prose - Catholic Novelists and Their Readers and The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 24 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Mystery and Manners; Occasional Prose.
This section contains 1,308 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Mystery and Manners; Occasional Prose Study Guide

Catholic Novelists and Their Readers and The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South Summary and Analysis

O'Connor relates the story of Francis of Assisi who converted a wolf. She does not know if the wolf is actually converted or not, but in the end he is still a wolf. This moral should ring true for the Christian novelist too because no matter how much he may be improved by the Church, he is still a writer and should remain true to that purpose. In fact, instead of living with restrictions, the Church should make him a better author.

O'Connor feels that writers should heed the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas who says that art does not necessitate restrictions; that a work of art is good in itself. Most people, however, are not content...

(read more from the Catholic Novelists and Their Readers and The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South Summary)

This section contains 1,308 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Mystery and Manners; Occasional Prose Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Mystery and Manners; Occasional Prose from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook