Murder as a Fine Art - Chapter 3: The Opium-Eater Summary & Analysis

David Morrell
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Summary

In the 1850’s, laudanum was widely used for any ailment because it’s addictive properties were, virtually, unrealized. Many Victorians used it on a daily basis to cure or control a wide variety of illnesses from stomach issues to headaches. Thomas De Quincey has used laudanum since he was a student at Oxford. He is addicted to the drug.

Emily helps with her father’s care and documents their ongoing adventure together. He insists on returning to London from his home in Edinburgh, and their arrival spurs memories of his younger years. On one of their walks, he tells Emily stories of living on the streets of London as he retraces the steps and places of his memories. Though he reveals the existence of a woman named Ann while walking, it will be quite awhile before Emily learns that she and her...

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This section contains 546 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Murder as a Fine Art Study Guide
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