William Shakespeare Writing Styles in Much Ado about Nothing

This Study Guide consists of approximately 20 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Much Ado about Nothing.
This section contains 515 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Much Ado about Nothing Study Guide

Name

Point of View

As a play, Much Ado About Nothing has the advantage of being able to provide numerous points of view within the omniscient, overall viewer experience. The viewer is privy not only to gossip, but also to the people overhearing the gossip. In this sense, unlike in a novel, the viewer has more information than any character in the play. Moreover, monologues and soliloquies help to reinforce the viewer's depth of understanding of individual characters. For example, after the masked ball scene, Benedick repeats many of Beatrice's insults over to himself, showing how deep her verbal spars have actually cut him. Similarly, when Beatrice overhears the staged conversation between Ursula and Hero in which they lament Beatrice's not returning Benedick's love, she then speaks in an aside to herself, mulling over her own motivations. In this sense, the play is both interior and exterior, and provides...

(read more from the Styles section)

This section contains 515 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Much Ado about Nothing Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Much Ado about Nothing from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.