Harlan Ellison Writing Styles in I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream

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Ellison has provided "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" with a limited, first-person narrator. Thus, all of the events of the story must be filtered through the mind and voice of Ted, one of the humans trapped by the computer AM. Because everything is told from the "I" perspective, the reader cannot ascertain what other characters are thinking or their motives for what they do. The reader can only know what the first-person narrator provides.

There are certain advantages to the use of a first-person narrator. In the first place, the use of the first-person pronoun makes the story seem immediate and compelling. It is as if a real person is telling the story directly to the reader, almost as if the narrator and the reader are engaged in a meaningful conversation. In addition, the use of the first-person encourages the reader to trust...

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This section contains 614 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream Study Guide
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