Mornings on Horseback - Part 2, Chapter 7 The Moral Effect Summary & Analysis

David McCullough
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Part 2, Chapter 7 The Moral Effect Summary

Even before 1876, political reform and the Roosevelt name had been linked in the public mind. Theodore joined the newly organized Republican Reform Club and was soon looked to for leadership. One person who the reformers wanted to stop was Senator Roscoe Conkling of New York, who had made his aspirations for President known. Theodore found almost everything about Conkling repugnant.

Conkling never attended national conventions, and he sent Chester Arthur to work on his behalf at the convention in Cincinnati. Theodore and the New York Reform Club were also there to support their candidate, Benjamin H. Bristow of Kentucky. The leading contender for the nomination was James G. Blaine, but he collapsed in Cincinnati.

On Monday, June 12, Theodore gave a speech from a balcony at the Gibson House, delivering a vivid attack on Conkling. The...

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