Forgot your password?  

Mending Wall Essay & Criticism

This Study Guide consists of approximately 27 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Mending Wall.
This section contains 501 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Mending Wall Study Guide

Critical Overview

In the early years of Frost's career, critics positioned Frost as a speaker for America, a connection between nature, art, individual, and nation. His imagery provided every reader with access to the American dream: a life of homespun, real texture and neighborly conversation. In the January 1917 issue of Poetry, Harriet Monroe comments on the natural style of Frost in the context of American history by evoking the country's birth: "His New England is the same old New England of the pilgrim fathers—a harsh, austere, velvet-coated-granite earth." Critics shared Monroe's opinion for the next several decades and echoed the patriotic tone, much like G. R. Elliott in the July 1925 issue of The Virginia Quarterly Review: "The Frostian humour is peculiarly important for America. No other of our poets has shown a mood at once so individual and so...

(read more from the Critical Overview section)

This section contains 501 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Mending Wall Study Guide
Copyrights
Mending Wall from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook