Medea Essay

This Study Guide consists of approximately 46 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Medea.
This section contains 1,991 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Medea Study Guide

In this essay Hamilton contrasts modern audience reaction to Euripides's play with fifth-century Greek perceptions of the drama.

Euripides's psychologically realistic portrayal of Medea, who indulges in an excessive form of revenge-the murder of her own children. This is a fascinating study of motivation, yet it is a topic safely distant to modern audiences. The people and society in Medea are part of ancient history. Today's audiences can consider and understand Medea's motivation while simultaneously dismissing it as both a work of fiction and as part of a past culture. However, to Euripides's fifth-century Athenian audience, Medea's act would, under the circumstances, make perfect sense. These Athenians, congregated in the temple of Dionysus to celebrate an annual ritual of dramatic performances, would give no more than a moment's thought to Medea's motivations. Instead, the significance of Medea's act would lie in the consequences to her society and in...

(read more)

This section contains 1,991 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Medea Study Guide
Copyrights
Drama for Students
Medea from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.