Writing Techniques in Maurice

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Forster's principal technique in Maurice emerges from his self-confessed determination to develop three major male characters, have his titled character fall in love with two of them, sacrifice one to societal tradition and convention, and then provide the novel with a happy ending because the remaining two characters find happiness with each other. "The general plan," wrote Forster in his "Terminal Note," ". . . all rushed into my pen. And the whole thing went through without a hitch." Forster termed the happy ending as "imperative"; Alec and Maurice would fall in love, remain so forever, and roam the "greenwood" of England. More importantly, for Forster, the lovers have committed a crime and gotten away with it.

Therefore, one might not stray too far from the mark by identifying the novel as a pure and not always simple love story, for it contains all of the elements of that form of fiction...

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This section contains 324 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Maurice Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Maurice from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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