Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson - Part 2 Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis

Robert Caro
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Part 2 Chapter 8 Summary

Russell was too busy ever to marry. When his father died in 1938, Young Dick became "Uncle Dick," assuming the family patriarchy. He enjoyed spending time at the Winder homestead, but had no intimate friends in Georgia; he felt he had to remain aloof. He felt awkward in Washington society. He rarely accepted dinner invitations from staff members and even stopped going to baseball games. Senate routine kept his days and evenings amply filled. At night, he read the Congressional Record, classified reports and books delivered from the Library of Congress. The Senate was his life.

Alerted by Bobby Baker, LBJ turned his attention to gaining membership on the Armed Service Committee in order to work alongside "the Old Master," and to prove his value by his own tireless work. He began visiting Russell's office to discuss business and to absorb wisdom...

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This section contains 1,328 words
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Buy the Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson Study Guide
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