The Autobiography of Mark Twain - Chapters 74-78 Summary & Analysis

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Chapters 74-78 Summary

The next several chapters are another set of various memories and opinions. He speaks briefly of his dislike for a woman named Marie Corelli. He also speaks of meeting with an English author, Elinor Glyn, and trying to convince her that she must be sensitive to conventional wisdom. This, although he says he agrees with her that human law is actually in opposition to God's law, and that the laws of Nature are paramount.

Next, Twain considers a trip he took to assist at the opening of the Thomas Bailey Aldrich Memorial Museum. Although he believed Aldrich's widow took on this project to stroke her own vanity, he wouldn't have missed it for anything.

Finally, Twain pokes fun at the superstition, apparently common in his day, that water rots the hair. He points out that water does good for everything else, so why not hair...

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This section contains 186 words
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