The Autobiography of Mark Twain - Chapter 28 Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 28 Summary

Twain was on assignment to Honolulu for a Sacramento newspaper, when survivors of the clipper Hornet came ashore. These people had lived 43 days on 10 days' rations on an open boat. Twain's story about them was the only complete account, so when he returned to California, he found he was a local celebrity.

Twain heeded advice to capitalize on his fame by breaking into the lecture business. His first lecture began with two minutes of stage fright, but Twain soon found out he could use his wonderful sense of humor to endear him to audiences.

Chapter 28 Analysis

Twain's humble account illustrates how much of life happens by sheer luck, or grace, depending on one's worldview. Later in this book, Twain will explain the popularity of the lecture circuit, called "The American Lyceum." People in the 1800s attended lectures the way people today follow rock concerts.

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This section contains 146 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Autobiography of Mark Twain Study Guide
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