The Autobiography of Mark Twain - Chapter 27 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 82 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Autobiography of Mark Twain.
This section contains 170 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Autobiography of Mark Twain Study Guide

Chapter 27 Summary

Twain learns in 1907 that an old friend, Jim Gillis, has died. Gillis was a natural storyteller that Twain knew during his years in California. Twain believes that with just a few years' training in writing, Gillis' literary genius would have made him famous.

Twain thinks a lot about the fact that Gillis' close friends and family were too close to recognize him as a genius. He reflects that a genius is usually not recognized by his intimates, nor himself.

Chapter 27 Analysis

Although this chapter was written or dictated in 1907, the editor has chosen to place it in somewhat chronological order. The bulk of the chapter is about Jim Gillis, so the editor fits it as close as possible to the time frame in which Twain lived in California.

Twain's recognition of Gillis as a literary genius is an example of Twain's respect for ordinary people. In spite...

(read more from the Chapter 27 Summary)

This section contains 170 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Autobiography of Mark Twain Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
The Autobiography of Mark Twain from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.