Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii.
This section contains 745 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii Study Guide

Progress

Mark Twain is aware of Hawaii's history, both recent and ancient, and sees Europe's influence as generally beneficial. When addressing Hawaii's distant past, Twain is inclined to use words such as "barbaric" or "savage." Modern Hawaiians, in Twain's mind, are more civilized thanks to the efforts of Christian missionaries. While there is a sense that the author is aware that something has been lost to the Hawaiians, Twain clearly believes that natives are better for the Christian influence and is proud to see how far the Hawaiians have come.

Mark Twain seeks to advance the cause of American interests. He regards Hawaii as an untapped resource with its fertile soil and tropical climate being well suited to the production of sugar cane. He suggests that Americans move to the Hawaiian Islands to secure America's foothold in the region. Twain also suggests, after seeing "coolie" labor in Hawaii, that...

(read more)

This section contains 745 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook