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Robert Bolt Writing Styles in A Man for All Seasons

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Style

Symbolism

Robert Bolt consciously inserted symbolism about the sea and water as "a figure for the superhuman context." In the play, references to currents and tides refer to shifts in the forces around More. Thus More's need to be steered by boat to see Wolsey or Cromwell or to return home indicates that he is at the mercy of others, whereas Henry VHf s boasting about steering a ship himself, albeit badly, indicates his arrogant usurpation of authority. In another manifestation of the sea image, More speaks to Roper of the "currents and eddies of right and wrong" as a sea he cannot navigate so simply as Roper does. More is "set against the current of [his] times."

The symbolism of clothing is another pervasive symbol in the play. From the very first scene, clothing represents identity that is simple to don or doff. For example, Roper demonstrates a...

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This section contains 639 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Man for All Seasons Study Guide
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A Man for All Seasons from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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