C. S. Lewis Writing Styles in The Magician's Nephew

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In The Magician's Nephew, Lewis writes in a third person omniscient perspective. The narrator is not a part of the story, although he does address the reader at several points in the story. This narrator is privy to the thoughts and feelings of Digory and Polly, in particular. The reader is able to especially see the sadness, hope, and temptations of Digory. By knowing Digory's thoughts, one can recognize the motivations behind his actions, and also how he feels about the events in Narnia.

The focus on the thoughts and feelings of Digory and Polly help to center the story on these characters and their adventures. This is important for several reasons. First, the focus on Digory and Polly helps to draw younger readers into the story. By allowing the reader to see their thoughts but by not including their ages or physical descriptions, younger readers...

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This section contains 875 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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