Aristophanes Writing Styles in Lysistrata

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Audience

The people for whom a drama is performed. Authors usually write with an audience in mind. Aristophanes writes for an audience interested in drama as entertainment, but this is also an audience that would expect the playwright to include important lessons about life. In this case, the lesson is about an effective society and government that allows a war to continue after so many years. This comedy uses satire and humor to suggest to the audience that the men in power have not been effective in dealing with the war.

Chorus

In ancient Greek drama, a chorus consisted of a group of actors who interpreted and commented on the play's action and themes, most often singing or chanting their lines. Initially the chorus had an important role in drama, as it does in Lysistrata, but over time its purpose was diminished, and as a result, the chorus became...

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This section contains 811 words
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Lysistrata from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.