Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream - Chapter 12, The Withdrawal Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
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Chapter 12, The Withdrawal Summary and Analysis

Faced with mounting criticism and a crumbling Great Society, Johnson withdrew to the White House, accessible only to those who continued to support his Vietnam strategy. Tuesday lunches were held, during which bombing targets and ground troop movements were determined. Gradually, attendance declined, as former "loyalists" became disenchanted and increasingly concerned about the president's tirades, paranoia, and irrationality. By March, 1968, it was over, and Johnson had announced his intention to retire from public life. It is commonly accepted now that two events finally convinced Johnson that the "gig" was up. First and most important was the Tet Offensive.

Tet is the name for the Vietnamese New Year. During this time, it was understood by both sides that fighting would cease. In 1968, however, the North Vietnamese and their Vietcong supporters in the south launched successful attacks in cities...

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This section contains 442 words
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Buy the Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream Study Guide
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