Lunch Poems - For the Chinese New Year & For Bill Berkson Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 21 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Lunch Poems.
This section contains 661 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Lunch Poems Study Guide

For the Chinese New Year & For Bill Berkson Summary

For the Chinese New Year & For Bill Berkson is the longest poem in the collection. It is divided into three parts, and it begins with an epigram by D.H. Lawrence, ruminating on entropy and loss.

Part 1 of the poem concerns the reality of New York City. O'Hara states that behind any semblance of order or kindness or civilization is a red, enraged face. This is the true face of the city, and it lives under the ramps, ready to destroy anything resembling sensitivity of kindness. The poet acknowledges that these finer emotions do exist, but they are no match for the monster that exists in the city. In this sense, ancient ordering like the Chinese calendar serves to mollify the terror. The poet takes comfort in these old...

(read more from the For the Chinese New Year & For Bill Berkson Summary)

This section contains 661 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Lunch Poems Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Lunch Poems from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook