Looking Backward: 2000-1887 Essay

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In the following essay, Abrash looks into the public acceptance of Bellamy's Looking Backwards.

A certain nineteenth-century writer, also active in journalism, created an extraordinary utopian vision in which all productive facilities were owned by society. Unlike the great majority of earlier utopian proposals, this one was specifically applicable to full-blown industrial technology and organization which, under centralized rational direction for use rather than profit, was presumed capable of providing all the world's people with the material necessities of a good life. This writer also envisioned an egalitarian incomes policy and the elimination of social classes. His vision spread rapidly and became part of western civilization's heritage of powerful ideas.

The summary thus far clearly fits Edward Bellamy—and just as clearly fits Karl Marx. But when we move ahead to the reception of their doctrines, a sharp divergence appears. Marx was fiercely attacked, harried out...

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This section contains 2,420 words
(approx. 7 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Looking Backward: 2000-1887 Study Guide
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Looking Backward: 2000-1887 from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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