William Carlos Williams Writing Styles in Overture to a Dance of Locomotives

This Study Guide consists of approximately 33 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Overture to a Dance of Locomotives.
This section contains 333 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Overture to a Dance of Locomotives Study Guide

Though the poem does not adhere to any conventional poetic form like a sonnet or a villanelle, it does possess a certain form. First of all, the opening stanzas are written in an uneven but effectively droll tetrameter. The lines do not intentionally rhyme, though an occasional end-rhyme sneaks into the poem. However, the steady rhythm of the first four stanzas is radically interrupted by the intrusion of outside voices, the shouts of the railway porters. Here, the lines become jagged and fragmentary, so that the narrative that was originally fairly symmetrical has now become asymmetrical. In keeping with the symphonic metaphor suggested by the title, the poem moves from harmony to discord, from consonance to dissonance. In poetic terms, the poem shifts from monologue to dialogue. The singular lyric voice has to give way to a collage of other voices, all of whom are competing for...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 333 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Overture to a Dance of Locomotives Study Guide
Copyrights
Poetry for Students
Overture to a Dance of Locomotives from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.