Forgot your password?  

The Lion in Winter Essay | Critical Essay #3

Anthony Harvey
This Study Guide consists of approximately 88 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Lion in Winter.
This section contains 1,927 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Lion in Winter Study Guide

Critical Essay #3

Goldfarb has a Ph.D. in English and has published two books on the Victorian author William Makepeace Thackeray. In the following essay, Goldfarb explores the significance of the family struggles in Goldman's play.

Towards the end of the first act of Lion in Winter, John, the youngest prince, is astonished and horrified when his older brother Richard pulls a knife on him. "A knife," he says, "he's got a knife." To which his mother, Eleanor, responds by saying: "Of course he has a knife. He always has a knife. We all have knives. It is eleven eighty-three and we're barbarians."

This is a joke, of course; it is in fact the sort of easy laugh line that some commentators have complained about in Goldman's play, but there are some interesting things going on in this passage nevertheless. The laugh itself derives from a sort of distancing effect...

(read more from the Critical Essay #3 section)

This section contains 1,927 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Lion in Winter Study Guide
Copyrights
The Lion in Winter from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook