The Light in the Forest Social Sensitivity

This Study Guide consists of approximately 49 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Light in the Forest.
This section contains 276 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Light in the Forest Study Guide

In an attempt to present Native American history and culture in an unbiased fashion, Richter inevitably contradicts the glorious myth of the early settlers. While Richter admires the pioneers' fortitude, as is clear from his frontier novels, The Light in the Forest shatters the settlers' moral stance by pointing to the irony in their seeking political, religious, and social freedom for themselves, while invading Native American territory, breaking treaties, and cheating the Native Americans.

They subjugate the Native Americans for economic gain, thereby destroying the Native American way of life. Furthermore, the novel questions the ethnocentrism of Western civilization and decries the racial injustice that prevails even in contemporary society.

As a novel that authentically recreates the American past, The Light in the Forest makes numerous references to war, scalpings, and killings that may be offensive to adults and disturbing to children. Most of these events...

(read more)

This section contains 276 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Light in the Forest Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Light in the Forest from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook